Orange County Reverse Mortgage – OCReverse.com

Orange County Reverse Mortgage

Top 5 reasons to talk to us about a Orange County Reverse Mortgage

  1. Financial planning. The value of your home will move up or down regardless of the mortgage you have on it, if any. Why not rebalance some equity into other investments? See our example case studies for more options, or ask us, but one family pulled money out of their primary home to buy a 2nd home for cash near their grandchildren. No equity was lost – they just shifted it from one house to two, and enjoy a better quality of life to be near family.
  2. Cash is King. It’s always better to have liquid funds available and not need it, than the other way around.
  3. Clear out medical or other debts, and improve your quality of life. One couple had several thousands of dollars in dental work they’d put on a credit card, and were steadily paying down via social security, but that meant not visiting their children. With a reverse mortgage you’ll still leave the home to your kids if that’s what you choose, they’ll just have a small mortgage on it they can refinance or pay off.
  4. Stay out of a Nursing Home. By planning ahead with retrofitting and in-home care when you’re further along and need some help, a Orange County Reverse Mortgage can help you by freeing up cash for this.
  5. Giving to family while you’re around to enjoy the transfer. A lot of well meaning families plan to leave their home to heirs – but by spreading this out over a number of years, you may be able to reduce the tax implications by staying below the annual gift-tax threshold, and you’re also able to have a hand in directing those funds toward grandkid’s college funds, travel together and more.

Next step: Schedule a free consultation with us about your Orange County Reverse Mortgage and get some options. No pressure – just numbers to consider.

More about our city…

Orange County is a county in Southern California, United States. Its county seat is Santa Ana. Its population of 3,056,865 (2005 estimate ) is larger than that of 20 states. It is the second most populous county in the state of California, and the fifth most populous in the United States. The county is known for its wealth and political conservatism, although it is in reality neither as uniformly wealthy nor as homogeneously conservative as its stereotypical image suggests.

It is also famous as a tourist destination, as the county is home to such attractions as Disneyland and Knott’s Berry Farm, as well as sandy beaches for swimming and surfing, yacht harbors for sailing and pleasure boating, and extensive acreage devoted to parks and open space for golf, tennis, hiking, kayaking, cycling, and other . It is at the center of Southern California’s Tech Coast.

Thirty-four incorporated cities are located in Orange County; the newest is Aliso Viejo, which is also the only city in the county to incorporate since 2000.

As of the census of 2000, there were 2,846,289 people, 935,287 households, and 667,794 families residing in the county, making Orange County the second most populous county in California. The population density was 3,606/mi². There were 969,484 housing units at an average density of 1,228/mi². The racial makeup of the county was 64.81% White, 13.59% Asian, 1.67% African American, 0.70% Native American, 0.31% Pacific Islander, 14.80% from other races, and 4.12% from two or more races. 30.76% are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

In 1990, still according to the census there were 2,410,556 people residing in the county. The racial makeup of the county was 64.49% White, not of Hispanic origins, 23.43% Hispanic or Latino, 9.99% Asian, 1.62% African American, 0.36% Native American, and 0.11% of some other race.

The county’s diverse racial makeup is under scrutiny and varied estimates by local minority group organizations, like the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) charged the US census undercounted Orange County’s small but fast-growing black population. Similar charges came from the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) and Asian-American leaders on the percentage of Latinos and Asians in the county is inaccurate, unless there are accidental undercounts or their growth rate is phenomenal to keep up their accuracy.

There were 935,287 households out of which 37.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.9% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.6% were non-families. 21.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.00 and the average family size was 3.48.

The population is diverse age-wise, with 27.0% under the age of 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 33.2% from 25 to 44, 20.6% from 45 to 64, and 9.9% 65 years of age or older. The median age is 33 years. For every 100 females there were 99.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.7 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $61,899, and the median income for a family was $75,700. Males had a median income of $45,059 versus $34,026 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,826. About 7.0% of families and 10.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.2% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.